Oregon and Nevada Adopt the Uniform Commercial Real Estate Receivership Act

By:  Ben Reeves

Nevada and Oregon join Utah in adopting the Uniform Commercial Real Estate Receivership Act (the “Act”) promulgated by the Uniform Law Commission.  We have been following the development of the Act since its drafting stages.  If you want more information about the Act, check out our prior posts about the drafting process, what the Act is and does, and Utah’s enactment of the Act.… Read More »

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What Happens When a Secured Creditor Files a Late Claim in an Equity Receivership?

By: Ben Reeves

Pitting a receivership court’s inherent equitable powers against pre-existing property rights can lead to some pretty interesting questions.  In SEC v. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., 848 F.3d 1339, 1343-44 (11th Cir. 2017), the Eleventh Circuit recently examined whether a district court’s inherent authority to establish a claims submission process allowed the court to extinguish a security interest in real property based solely upon an untimely proof of claim.  Much to the relief of secured creditors, the Eleventh Circuit held that the district court erred, as a matter of law, by extinguishing the creditor’s pre-existing property rights under those circumstances.… Read More »

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California Supreme Court Hands Victory to Private Property Owners Over Public Use

By:  Sean M. Sherlock

In 1970 the California Supreme Court held that, under certain circumstances, private property owners impliedly dedicate their property to the public if they permit the public to use it. Gion v. City of Santa Cruz (1970) 2 Cal.3d 29.  This holding was controversial, and the next year the California Legislature enacted Civil Code section 1009 limiting the public’s ability to permanently use private property through an implied dedication.

In the 40-plus years since then, the lower courts have wrestled with the issue of whether the statute limiting implied dedication applies only to recreational uses by the public, or also to nonrecreational uses.… Read More »

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Applying New California Rules to Your Real Estate Litigation Practice

By: Lyndsey Torp

Several new California procedural rules went into effect on January 1, 2016. While we are several months into the new year, litigators may need a reminder of these new rules.  The list below summarizes several of the notable new rules.

  • Pleading Stage
    • New California Code of Procedure section 430.41(a)(2) mandates that the parties meet and confer at least five days before filing a demurrer (California’s motion to dismiss). If the parties fail to meet and confer, the demurring party may submit a declaration to the court explaining why the meet and confer did not happen, and the demurring party is granted an automatic 30-day extension.
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The Uniform Law Commission Approves the Uniform Commercial Real Estate Receivership Act

By: Ben Reeves

As we previously reported here, several years ago the Uniform Law Commission (the “ULC”) (the organization that drafted such favorites as the Uniform Commercial Code and the Uniform Arbitration Act) determined that states would benefit from a model act that would govern the powers, rights, and duties of receivers appointed over commercial real property. Since that time, a drafting committee has worked diligently to prepare a comprehensive statute that would address this unique area of law. The ULC recently approved the drafting committee’s final version, and the result is the Uniform Commercial Real Estate Receivership Act (the “Act”).… Read More »

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If Receiver’s Sales Aren’t Foreclosures, What Are They?

By:  Ben Reeves & Bob Olson

When no statute specifically authorizes a court-appointed receiver to sell real property, what type of sale is it?  The Supreme Court of Nevada recently addressed this question, holding that “a receiver sale of real property that secures a loan is a form of judicial foreclosure.”  U.S. Bank v. Palmilla Dev. Co., 131 Nev. Adv. Op. 9 (2015).

Facts

In U.S. Bank v. Palmilla, U.S. Bank made a $20.15 million loan to Palmilla Development Company secured by a development of townhomes.  Palmilla defaulted, and U.S. Bank applied for, and obtained, the appointment of a receiver over its real property collateral.… Read More »

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The Uniform Law Commission Makes Progress Drafting a Model Act on the Appointment and Powers of Real Estate Receivers

By:  Ben Reeves

If all goes as planned, the Uniform Law Commission will finalize and promulgate a model act dealing with the appointment and powers of commercial real estate receivers at some point in 2015.  Last month, the Drafting Committee for this model act met in Minneapolis, MN to discuss and revise the latest draft.  Since a significant part of my practice is devoted to real estate receiverships in Arizona, I flew up to Minnesota to participate in the meeting as an Observer.

Led by Chair, Tom Hemmendinger, and Reporter, Wilson Freyermuth, the committee meticulously analyzed every aspect of the draft act, including the grounds for appointment, the receiver’s powers upon appointment, the rights of third-parties affected by a receivership, and – by far the most provocative issue – whether a receiver should have the power to sell real property. … Read More »

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