IRS Changes Course on Lump Sums to Retirees

In Notice 2019-18, the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) changed its position and now will permit employers to offer lump sum payments to retirees who are currently receiving annuity payments from a defined benefit plan.  This is a reversal from its position in Notice 2015-49, in which the Treasury Department and the IRS stated that they intended to propose amendments to the required minimum distribution regulations to address the payment of lump sums to replace ongoing annuity payments under a defined benefit plan.  Prior to the issuance of Notice 2015-49, a number of defined benefit plans started offering retirees who were receiving annuities an opportunity to elect to convert their annuities into lump sum benefits during a limited period of time in what became known as “de-risking” transactions.  Read More ›

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IRS Issues Updated Tax Notice for Qualified Retirement Plan Distributions

The Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) recently released guidance that contains two updated safe harbor notices that retirement plans may use to satisfy the requirements of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”) to provide an advance notice to a participant prior to the date on which the participant receives a distribution that meets the requirements for an eligible rollover distribution.  This notice is commonly referred to as the “402(f) Notice” after the relevant section of the Code that requires the notice to be provided.

The IRS guidance contains two model notices, one that may be used when distributions are not from a Roth account and a second model notice that may be used for distributions that are from a Roth account. Read More ›

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IRS Updates Retirement Plan Correction Procedures

On September 28, 2018, the IRS released Revenue Procedure 2018-52. The Revenue Procedure makes changes to the IRS Employee Plans Compliance Resolution System (“EPCRS”), which is the IRS’ comprehensive correction program for qualified retirement plans.  The primary purpose of the Revenue Procedure is establishing the process for filing correction applications and paying the applicable user fee through the www.pay.gov website.

Beginning April 1, 2019, the IRS will no longer accept paper applications meaning that plan sponsors are required to use pay.gov to submit their application and pay their user fees.  During a transition period running from January 1 – March 31, 2019, plan sponsors may, but are not required to, file their EPCRS applications online. Read More ›

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A New Perspective on Student Loan Repayment Benefits

On August 17, 2018, the Internal Revenue Service (the “Service”) published a Private Letter Ruling (the “PLR”) describing a unique student loan repayment program in the context of a qualified retirement plan.

Proposed Student Loan Repayment Program

As described in the PLR, an Employer sponsors a Section 401(k) defined contribution plan that permits elective deferrals. The plan requires the Employer to make a matching contribution equal to 5% of an eligible employee’s compensation for a given pay period if such employee makes an elective contribution of at least 2% of his or her compensation during the same period.

The Employer proposed to amend the plan to incorporate a student loan repayment program (the “Program”). Read More ›

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Congress Eases Restrictions on Hardship Distributions

We previously reported on certain changes made to the hardship distribution rules for qualified retirement plans by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.  Since then, Congress has made additional and significant changes to those same hardship distribution rules by the passage of the Bipartisan Budget Act (the “BBA”).  The BBA loosens various restrictions on a participant’s ability to request and receive a hardship distribution.  In particular, the BBA provides:

  1. Effective for plan years beginning after December 31, 2018, participants may receive hardship distributions comprised of employee elective deferrals, employer contributions and earnings on both.  Traditionally, hardship distributions were limited to employee elective deferrals and did not include qualified nonelective contributions, qualified matching contributions, safe harbor contributions or earnings on the same.
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Review of Qualified Plan Compensation Definition May be Needed Due To Tax Reform

Tax reform made few changes that directly impact qualified retirement plans; however, it made some changes that may indirectly impact qualified retirement plans.  We previously blogged on the indirect changes that tax reform had on hardship distributions. 

Tax reform also made changes to the taxation of certain fringe benefits that may impact the definition of “compensation” used in some qualified plans. Some qualified plans define compensation for plan purposes based on the taxability of a fringe benefit.  For example, a qualified plan may exclude from its definition of compensation “moving expenses, to the extent excluded from gross income.”  After tax reform, employers may no longer pay or reimburse moving expenses on a tax-free basis.  Read More ›

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Hardship Distribution Changes – Tax Reform May Have Unintended Consequences

When tax reform proposals were floating around in the fall of 2017, several early proposals to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) included changes to the hardship distribution rules for qualified retirement plans. However, the final version of the Act did not make any direct changes to hardship distributions.  Nevertheless, the Act, perhaps unintentionally, made a significant change to the circumstances under which a participant can request a hardship for a personal casualty loss.

Personal Casualty Loss

The Act changed to the definition of a “personal casualty loss” under Section 165 of the Internal Revenue Code (the “Code”). Under the revised definition of 165, a personal casualty loss is only deductible if it is attributable to a federally declared disaster (i.e. Read More ›

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IRS Publishes 2017 Required Amendments List

 

In our 2017 End of Year Plan Sponsor “To Do” List (Part 4) Qualified Plans, we suggested that sponsors of all qualified retirement plans should be on the lookout for the Internal Revenue Service’s (“IRS”) 2017 Required Amendments List (“RA List”).  The IRS recently published Notice 2017-72, which contains the 2017 RA List, https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/n-17-72.pdf

Part A of the RA List addresses changes in qualification requirements that require amendments to most plans (or to the types impacted by the change).  The 2017 RA List contains two changes in Part A:  those required by final regulations regarding cash balance/hybrid plans and those that address benefit restrictions for certain defined benefit plans that are eligible cooperative plans or eligible charity plans described in Section 204 of the Pension Protection Act of 2006, as amended.  Read More ›

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Making a List, Checking it Twice – 2017

It’s that time of year when boys and girls start making their lists for the holidays, but we in the employee benefits world make a very different kind of list.  In the rapidly changing world of employee benefits and executive compensation law, checklists can be particularly helpful to make sure important issues do not fall through the cracks.  Each year we publish health and welfare, cost-of-living, executive compensation, and qualified retirement plan checklists to help individuals stay apprised of changes in the law, changes that they might need to make to their employee benefits plans, and various notice requirements.  We just published the last of our annual checklists.  Read More ›

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IRS Announces 2018 Cost of Living Adjustments

This post has been updated as of June 7, 2018, to reflect the revised maximum annual HSA contribution limit for family coverage set out in Revenue Procedures 2018-18 and 2018-27.

The IRS recently announced cost-of-living adjustments for 2018 in Notice 2017-64 and related guidance.  The key dollar limits for qualified retirement plans and health and welfare plans are noted below.

Qualified Retirement Plan Dollar Limits

  2017 2018
Limit on Section 401(k) deferrals (Section 402(g)) $18,000 $18,500
Dollar limitation for catch-up contributions (Section 414(v)(2)(B)(i)) $6,000 $6,000
Limit on deferrals for government and tax-exempt organization deferred compensation plans (Section 457(e)(15)) $18,000 $18,500
Annual benefit limitation for a defined benefit plan (Section 415(b)(1)(A)) $215,000 $220,000
Limitation on annual contributions to a defined contribution plan (Section 415(c)(1)(A)) $54,000 $55,000
Limitation on compensation that may be considered by qualified retirement plans (Section 401(a)(17)) $270,000 $275,000
Dollar amount for the definition of highly compensated employee (Section 414(q)(1)(B)) $120,000 $120,000
Dollar amount for the definition of a key employee in a top-heavy plan (Section 416(i)(1)(A)(i)) $175,000 $175,000
Dollar amount for determining the maximum account balance in an ESOP subject to a five-year distribution period (Section 409(o)(1)(C)(ii)) $1,080,000 $1,105,000
SIMPLE retirement account limitation (Section 408(p)(2)(E)) $12,500 $12,500
Social Security Taxable Wage Base $127,200 $128,700

Health and Welfare Plan Dollar Limits

  2017 2018
Annual Cost Sharing Limit (self-only coverage) $7,150 $7,350
Annual Cost Sharing Limit (other than self-only coverage) $14,300 $14,700
HDHP Out-of-Pocket Maximum (self-only coverage) $6,550 $6,650
HDHP Out-of-Pocket Maximum (family coverage) $13,100 $13,300
Annual HDHP Deductible (self-only coverage) Not less than $1,300 Not less than $1,350
Annual HDHP Deductible (family coverage) Not less than $2,600 Not less than $2,700
Maximum Annual HSA Contributions (self-only coverage) $3,400 $3,450
Maximum Annual HSA Contributions (family coverage) $6,750 $6,900*
Maximum HSA Catch-Up Contribution $1,000 $1,000
Health Flexible Spending Account Maximum $2,600 $2,650

* The maximum annual HSA contribution for family coverage was reduced from $6,900 to $6,850 by Revenue Procedure 2018-18.  Read More ›

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